Tag: Time Travel

New on Netflix – A Favorite

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Netflix has some new movies, one of which is “Midnight in Paris” (2011)  I love it!  I laughed and cried.

For you author folks or time-travel wannabees, this is a great watch.  It’s a five kernel feast, at least for me.  It one best screenplay at the Oscars and Golden Globes, plus other awards. 93% on the Tomato meter.

Read my former review HERE.

Some of my favorite quotes:

Gil: Would you read it?

Ernest Hemingway: Your novel?

Gil: Yeah, it’s about 400 pages long, and I’m just looking for an opinion.

Ernest Hemingway: My opinion is I hate it.

Gil: Well you haven’t even read it yet.

Ernest Hemingway: If it’s bad, I’ll hate it because I hate bad writing, and if it’s good, I’ll be envious and hate all the more. You don’t want the opinion of another writer.

 

*****

Paul: Nostalgia is denial – denial of the painful present… the name for this denial is golden age thinking – the erroneous notion that a different time period is better than the one one’s living in – it’s a flaw in the romantic imagination of those people who find it difficult to cope with the present.

*****

Gertrude Stein: The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence.

Timeless (NBC 2016)

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Let’s face it – I love anything to do with time travel – well most everything.  The Time Machine (1960 Movie with Rod Taylor) sticks in my mind as my first adventure across time and space.  However, when Stephan Hawking announced that time travel really isn’t possible, it broke my bubble. Nevertheless, we have plenty of books, comics, movies, and television shows to tell us otherwise.  Just look at this list of time-travel related entertainment!  CLICK HERE

The newest on the horizon to mess up the time/space continuum is Timeless, a new NBC network show.  I caught the first few episodes on Hulu, since I missed them on television due to my out-of-the-country vacation in timeless England.  Anyway…

Enter the cast – Lucy Preston (played by Abigail Spencer), a professor of history, who gets sucked into time travel thanks to the bad guys stealing the time machine that no one knew existed (except the good guys hiding it not so good from the bad guys).  Because of Lucy’s impressive historical knowledge, she is engaged by Homeland Security to save America’s future. Along for the ride is Wyatt Logan (played by Matt Lanter), who is the gun-packing hero bringing the heat.

Lucy’s first encounter with the past for the pilot is the the Hindenburg disaster, which occurred on May 6, 1937. It was the German passenger airship that caught fire and plunged to the earth killing most of the crew and passengers. The bad guy, Garcia Flynn (played by Goran Visnjic) and his team has returned to change how the accident plays out.  Of course, the audience is kept in the dark as to why and what he’s trying to change in the future.  Their second encounter is President Lincoln’s assassination, which is a rather good and emotional look into that incident.

Of course, like any other time travel scenario, when you change the past you change the future. The little incidents gone haywire in the past have changed Lucy’s situation in the first two episodes, and no doubt this occurrence will continue in Timeless as things get screwed up in the past.  Perhaps it’s a good thing that we can’t time travel.

The show seems promising, and I will continue to tune in on the future episodes airing on Monday nights.  However, for some reason deep down in my gut I don’t think this new show is going to last for years on end – my prediction for the future.

 

Midnight in Paris (Movie 2011)

5 Kernels

Stars: Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard, Kathy Bates, Carla Bruni, Adrien Brody, Michael Sheen

I will admit that I occasionally find no interest in movies based on their title and cover.  “Midnight in Paris” happened to be one of those that I had no desire to watch. Frankly, I’m not that interested in vacationing in Paris, so I thought the movie wouldn’t interest me if that happened to be the subject matter.  I knew it did well in Oscar nominations and wins for Woody Allen, but it didn’t incite me to watch it anyway.

So here we are, four years later, and I rent it on Amazon Prime streaming instant video.  What a fantastic romantic comedy with a message that, for me as an author, goes straight to my heart.

Meet Gil Pender, a screenwriter and hopeful novelist, who is vacationing in Paris.  He is somewhat like me in the fact that he fantasizes about eras past. For him, it’s the 1920’s in Paris, while for me I’m stuck in the Victorian Era.  Gil thinks that life must have been really peachy in Paris with the great upcoming artists of its time like F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Stein, Picasso, and many others.  In fact, he is so in love with Paris, that he tries to talk his fiancee to moving there to live after they marry. However, she’s more of a realist and really wants to stay in the states in Malibu and Hollywood.

One evening, when his girlfriend would rather go dancing than walk back to the hotel with him, they go their separate ways. Gil wanders around the city trying to find his way back.  A classic car from the past pulls up and stops. The occupants encourage him to take a ride with him, so he climbs in for fun, drinks, and the time of his life. They arrive at a party, and low and behold, he’s been transported back into 1920 meeting the people he has admired his entire life. When he returns to reality, his fiancee thinks he has a brain tumor. Nevertheless, each night he goes back, and when the clock strikes midnight, his ride returns for another adventure.

The story is filled with wonderful themes, and for me as an author, I laughed, oohed, and awed, over some stellar lines.  When Gil asks Hemingway to read his book, he replies, “If it’s bad, I’ll hate it because I hate bad writing, and if it’s good, I’ll be envious and hate all the more. You don’t want the opinion of another writer.” 

However, the most poignant part of the movie is the theme that those who are nostalgic about former eras, thinking they were better than the present, are misguided.  Michael Sheen, who plays a know-it-all vying for the affections of Gil’s girlfriend, states this one spot-on statement.

“Nostalgia is denial – denial of the painful present… the name for this denial is golden age thinking – the erroneous notion that a different time period is better than the one one’s living in – it’s a flaw in the romantic imagination of those people who find it difficult to cope with the present.”

Of course, as a writer of historical romances, and understanding the need for women who read them, it is quite true. The magic realization is that each generation feels the same. A woman that Gil falls for in the 1920’s, dreams about living in the Belle Epoque time period (the overlapping era of Victorian and Edwardian). That generation probably fantasized about the Regency era.

All in all, I enjoyed the movie thoroughly. It was lighthearted, thought provoking, and some of the lines were diamonds.  Woody Allen is a genius at times, and his multiple awards for the screenplay were well deserved.

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