Category: Reviews

Line of Duty – S5 (2019)

line-of-duty-season-5-avatar

Thank God for Acorn TV for us across-the-pond fans. Line of Duty, the BBC hit and highest rated series in the UK, is now on Acorn TV.  It started May 13th.  Like a junkie on drugs, I watched five episodes straight in the row until I couldn’t keep my eyes open.  Savored episode six with dinner the next day while eating my microwave TV turkey and gravy (what else).  What a freaking season!  This show is addicting.

Bent coppers – that’s what it’s about.  You don’t know who to believe.  Suspicion with a capital “S” pointing to Superintendent Ted Hastings.  By the end of the episode, you’re raging on Twitter #lineofduty – Free Ted.

Here’s a good rundown from DigitalSpy about Season 5 and how it may be frustrating to some viewers.  Naturally, the mystery remains.  People you thought were the good guys are turning out to be the corrupt guys.  Where is Season 6 going to take us?

Season 5 is interrogation overload, for sure (…let me turn your attention to page…), and by the end there still is corruption in the force.  Of course, the writers and producers are going to make us wait again to find out what comes next.  Buggers.

And one last thought, for a woman who can play parts such as docile Mrs. Darcy in DeathB Comes to Pemberley, Esther Summerson in Bleak House, or Bessy Higgins in North & South, Anna Maxwell Martin can really play a woman on a mission with a bitchy attitude that makes you squirm in your seat.  Let’s face it, when you want to gag a character in a TV show, the actress is doing a great job of making you despise her.   Well done Anna.

And last, but not least, there definately (pun here) should be multiple kudos flung at Adrian Dunbar.  Well done, Superintendent.  You had me shaking in the hot seat with you.

The Spanish Princess (Starz 2019)

Spanish-Princess-Starz-Poster-758x758 The White Queen, The White Princess have past, and now The Spanish Princess is the new Starz series based off of Philippa Gregory’s books.  I enjoyed The White Queen more than The White Princess, but that doesn’t matter. The story has moved years ahead with Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth awaiting the arrival of the Spanish Princess to marry Arthur, the heir to the English throne. Betrothed as children, Catherine of Aragon, the daughter of the two Spanish monarchs is about to save England, bringing the power of Spain behind a weakened and bankrupt England.

The only difficult switch between these series is that the cast changes each time, and continuity of character is often lost.  Three Margaret Beauforts have played the three series, all who have portrayed the parts much differently.  However, based on the years that pass between each series, it’s probably understandable that the same actors cannot always be available to carry on the characters as they age in a story line.

In The White Princess, we watched young and uncertain Henry VII take the throne, surrounded by enemies and those would who take the title back from him. Now aging and still somewhat fraught with self-esteem issues and a controlling wife, he anxiously awaits the marriage of Catherine and Arthur to bring stability back to England.

We are introduced to a young Infanta (the daughter of a ruling monarch of Spain), who is headstrong and certain in her calling to become Queen of England.  She’s obedient to her mother, assured, and not afraid to speak her mind. Her purpose in life is to rule England alongside her husband, however, shortly after they wed Arthur dies.  Along the sidelines is a younger and more roguish Henry (he says, “please call me Harry”), who will soon take his place as Catherine’s husband instead.

The historical timeline is not accurate.  They depict Henry as the younger brother of Arthur much older. Historically, Arthur was fifteen and Henry ten at the time when Catherine arrived. She was sixteen. Charlotte Hope plays the young princess and fits the older stereotype, however, the actress’ accent makes it difficult to always catch watch she is saying.

Of course, this is an adaptation, if you will, of history itself.  Slightly altered to make the Spanishstory more interesting, rather than letting you wait all those years after Arthur’s death for Henry to become of age (seventeen) before he marries Catherine.  In this story line, the sparks are already flying between the two, and as history records, supposedly, Catherine and Henry were happy for many years. Of course, the son he wanted never arrived and eventually his eyes wandered after twenty years of marriage to Anne Boleyn.

I thought it interesting in the second episode that they allude the marriage was consummated between Arthur and Catherine, when in fact she denies it after Arthur’s death.  In a sense, they leave the audience hanging.  For some reason, I thought they would stay true to her claims, but now it really opens up the question whether she did lie in order to marry Henry and save her marriage.  We will never know.  Somewhere I read that Arthur boasted after the wedding night that “last night I was in Spain,” which was quoted in episode two.

Die-hard historical lovers will bewail this series, and they have already done so. Complaints from the wrong ages to terrible accents have filled social media. Also, don’t get the fashion experts started, or you’ll be drawn into debates about the clothing and hairstyles.  Nevertheless, I say, let Starz and Phillipa Gregory have their creative liberties to tweak history. The story is interesting, and frankly, I haven’t thought much about what Catherine went through to come from a foreign land and marry Arthur. It’s a good perspective on what she endured and the challenges she faced.

Women of this time period were pawns in the game of thrones being married and carted off to kingdoms to form alliances. They had no choice, but destinies to fulfill whether they liked them or not.  I can watch this series with interest based on the fact it makes me think about her mark on history.  For me, that’s good enough.

 

Tolkien (Movie 2019)

Tolkien_film_promotional_poster3 Stars

I had high hopes seeing this movie about the famous author but came away somewhat disappointed in the outcome. It has its good parts, drawn out boring parts, undeniable heartfelt parts, but also horrific parts. It focuses on the young life of Tolkien from boyhood to young adult, ending with the time he wrote Hobbit.

The movie, I think, makes the mistake of too many flashbacks from the present to past, leaving you dizzy in the changes. It begins with Tolkien in the trenches suffering from trench fever, desperately attempting to find a friend (one of the three he has a “fellowship” with from boyhood) serving during WWI.  What he sees around him are the hallucinations of his mind, that often correspond to his future stories – fire breathing dragons, death riding a horse, spirits of black whirling over the dead carnage. The scenes from the trenches are horrific to say the least, with pools of blood and dead young men strewn across the battlefield. If the director wanted to make the point of the horrors of WWI, he did so to the point I moaned at many of the scenes.

After his mother’s untimely death, his priest arranges for him and his brother to be fostered by an elderly lady. He is sent to school but at first has trouble making friends. Eventually, he becomes part of a group of boys, who grow into manhood, that consist of three other creative minds – writer, artist, composer. They form a bonded fellowship, out to change the world.  There are many scenes of his boyhood and young adult life to university with his friends.

The movie ends years after the war and the aftermath it had on the four men.  Not all return home. Tolkien is married to his childhood sweetheart, now with children, and mulling over fantasy stories in his head, beginning to write his famous works.

I wasn’t overly impressed with the movie, although it was interesting to see the beginning life of a literary genius.  Nicolas Hoult did a fine job portraying Tolkien (that’s pronounced Tol-keen) by the way.  If you admire his books and stories, you’ll enjoy the movie nevertheless.

 

Lord of the Rings Amazon TV series: Release date, Cast Trailer | Prime Video – Radio Times

The series will reportedly follow the adventures of a young Aragorn

Source: Lord of the Rings Amazon TV series: release date, cast, trailer | Prime Video – Radio Times

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