Category: Netflix

SAFE (Canal+ and Netflix 2018)

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How does one feel safe in a neighborhood? Does fencing in the community help keep the boogie-man out or does it actually keep the boogie-man safe within? It’s a question that comes up in this interesting series entitled SAFE, which was done by Netflix and Canal+. It’s a pretty intriguing mystery with a surprising twist at the end. Just don’t Google the answer if a certain character makes it or dies before you finish all eight episodes. You are liable to read the spoiler about the end. Ruined it for me!  Dang-it.

The series is set in England and involves an English doctor with two daughters, one of which goes missing after a wild house party she attends. The daughter of one of the parents in the fenced neighborhood has a wild drinking and drug party while her parents are away. Unfortunately, when the host steps outside for a breath of fresh air, she finds a dead body of one of the male attendees floating in the swimming pool.

The deceased is the boyfriend of Tom Delaney’s elder daughter, who hasn’t come home from the night before. As the police deal with the who-done-it questions about the dead boy, Tom is out searching frantically for his daughter.

His search uncovers all sorts of mysteries surrounding his deceased wife, and everything become very convoluted as the web of neighborhood deceit becomes stickier than ever. There are a few subplots along the way regarding others neighbors, and a huge secret that answers all the questions is glossed over early in the series.

It’s a good mystery.  Worth the watch.

 

New on Netflix – A Favorite

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Netflix has some new movies, one of which is “Midnight in Paris” (2011)  I love it!  I laughed and cried.

For you author folks or time-travel wannabees, this is a great watch.  It’s a five kernel feast, at least for me.  It one best screenplay at the Oscars and Golden Globes, plus other awards. 93% on the Tomato meter.

Read my former review HERE.

Some of my favorite quotes:

Gil: Would you read it?

Ernest Hemingway: Your novel?

Gil: Yeah, it’s about 400 pages long, and I’m just looking for an opinion.

Ernest Hemingway: My opinion is I hate it.

Gil: Well you haven’t even read it yet.

Ernest Hemingway: If it’s bad, I’ll hate it because I hate bad writing, and if it’s good, I’ll be envious and hate all the more. You don’t want the opinion of another writer.

 

*****

Paul: Nostalgia is denial – denial of the painful present… the name for this denial is golden age thinking – the erroneous notion that a different time period is better than the one one’s living in – it’s a flaw in the romantic imagination of those people who find it difficult to cope with the present.

*****

Gertrude Stein: The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence.

Medici: Masters of Florence

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A new series, acquired by Netflix and popular in Italy, is now streaming – Medici: Masters of Florence.  If you’re a history buff, you might enjoy this new binge-watching opportunity regarding the Medici family who were bankers in the 15th century in the Republic of Florence.  For more historical information, run over to Wikipedia and READ HERE.

The story stars Richard Madden, Stuart Martin, and Dustin Hoffman, among others. It begins with the death of Giovanni, who is the founder of the Medici family empire. His son, Cosimo de’ Medici takes over the family business and learns that his father had been murdered.  The intrigue begins.

Be prepared to flop back and forth between a twenty-year period when Giovanni is alive and teaching his sons, as well as manipulating their lives to do his will. Sometimes it’s difficult to discover if you’re twenty years in the past or twenty years in the future, except for the difference in the hairstyles of the two sons.

Controlling, conniving, and underhandedly through bribery, the elder Giovanni influences the choice of the next pope. Its reward is to be the Vatican’s banker, which leads to prestige and additional wealth. In addition, he arranges a marriage for Cosimo (after sending away the woman he loves), and forbids his son to follow his true interest in life of art and architecture. The family business comes first.

I didn’t exactly find it the best of series for a few reasons:

  1. Miscasting – Dustin Hoffman is a poor choice to play the matriarch of the family – Giovanni. His acting is not up to par, and he just doesn’t fit the historical character’s role.
  2. Sound quality is absolutely terrible. Constantly, I had to crank up the volume to hear what they were saying, which I found annoying.  This is an Italian production acquired exclusively by Netflix (though not by Netflix), so I’m not sure if that is the reason.

What works:

  1. The semi-interesting historical story line.
  2. The ancient city of Florence and its architecture.
  3. The costumes.
  4. History lessons on screen, such as the Black Death pandemic that was estimated to have killed 30-60% of Europe’s population.
  5. The surprising plot twist at the end of Season 1.

Nevertheless, check it out for a new period drama feast but beware it may not be your best meal.

The Crown: everything you need to know about Netflix’s £100 million series about the Queen’s reign

 

“The success of Downton Abbey across the Atlantic proved that American audiences are suckers for a British period drama. Which helps to explain why Netflix, the US video-on-demand service, is staking £100 million on a series about the Queen – from the early years of her reign through to the present day.”

 Looks like a great cast, including one of my favorites – Jeremy Northam.

Source: The Crown: everything you need to know about Netflix’s £100 million series about the Queen’s reign

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