Category: Canadian TV

Republic of Doyle (2010-2014 CBC)

3 Kernels

Making my way through the fourth season and having peeked at the last episode of the series, I’ve been hooked on the Republic of Doyle, a CBC Canadian television series, for the past few weeks. The show quickly sucked me in, wore me out, regained interest, and keeps me going eventually through seasons five and six.

Meet Jake Doyle, the womanizer private detective, in business with his father. Set in the colorful St. John’sNewfoundland and Labrador location, you get to ride along in a few terrifying road trips in Jake’s classic GTO car.  Between the women and the cases, it’s filled with interesting and terrifying characters that keep your interest.  The comedy of the show is intermixed with family and others who make up the eclectic cast that often goes and comes in episodes.  A surprise episode with Russell Crowe is thrown into the mix. Nevertheless, the basic family core is pretty much the same throughout give or take a few siblings.

One question remains unanswered, however.  How often can a person get hit in the head and knocked out before there is brain damage? Since this happens to Jake and his assistant, Des, multiple times, you begin to realize it’s just part of the writer’s ploy to make it ridiculous.  If you can get past that often irrational plotline, you will enjoy Jake’s blue eyes, six-pack abs, and interesting character.

As far as the cases go, they are sometimes repetitive but usually interesting. Jake breaks the law more often than not but his romantic love interest on the police force is his saving grace in many ways.

To be honest, after season one through three, I got a little burned out and had to recoup by watching season two of No Offense. I quickly binged that with the six forty-five minute episodes and have returned to the Republic.

If you’re into PI shows, you will probably enjoy this one via Canada.

 

19-2 (Canadian TV 2014-2017)

19-23 Kernels

19-2.  You may think that’s an odd title for a series.  As a matter of explanation, 19-2 is the number of the police car where two opposite personalities are partnered up at a Montreal Police Department station.  Nick Barron, whose former partner was shot and gravely injured, is paired with a newly transferred Ben Chartier from the north country.  You’ll be doing ride alongs in the back seat of their patrol car as well as the cars of other cops in the station.

I’ll preface this review by saying I was once married to a Detroit Police Officer for three short years back in the early 1970’s.  I am quite familiar with the drama that being a cop can bring into personal relationships, and this television series will immerse you into the same type of drama from rocky relationships, wife beaters, alcoholics, infidelity, and a host of other emotional baggage that comes with the job.

To add to the interest of this particular series, the audience is part of their daily routines in a city that isn’t exactly a cop-loving environment.  They deal with the same community problems of being accused of being too rough, having their calls taped on cell phones, complaints of not doing enough or doing too much, etc.  Frankly, it’s not often they can do anything right except save someone’s life when needed.

The show also, like most police stories, deals with corruption in the department. Station 19 has a mole.  Whenever there’s a raid, police are either in a trap or the criminals are long gone ahead of time.  The story weaves in and out of that storyline, along with the personal lives – one policeman an alcoholic, one going through a divorce, one beats his wife, and love affairs left and right.  Beware this is graphic sexual content throughout the show with minutes of rutting from front to rear and naked bodies (sorry to be so graphic as the content but that’s how it is).  If that turns you off, then don’t turn it on.  After three episodes, I was frankly sick of seeing it.  In addition, the team often beat up each other because they can’t deal with their anger.  Also, the “F” word is used often.

Emotions run high in this series. If you’re curious about day-to-day lives of police on the street, it’s a must-see.  If you have any prejudice against police beforehand, you probably won’t like it at all.  For me, it hit home, having been married to an unfaithful and alcoholic policeman for three years.  I know the stress of the job because it’s up front and quite personal.  Yes, I loved the man in spite of having to iron his uniform shirts. While on duty, he met someone else, and my ride-along in his life ended with a broken heart.

 

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