Far From the Madding Crowd (Movie 2015)

5 Kernels

Stars: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts, Michael Sheen, and Tom Sturridge

At last, Far From the Madding Crowd finally released in a handful of theaters in Portland. I have agonized for months, fearing I would not see it on the big screen. However, fate allowed me the opportunity, and I’m so glad that I took advantage even though the drive through traffic nearly gave me a nervous breakdown.

If you are looking for a sumptuous and gorgeously filmed period drama, I don’t think you will be disappointed. The musical score is wonderful, too, and I’ve been listening to it for a few weeks on Amazon Cloud.  Hearing the music attached to the story only made me appreciate the score even more.

If you know nothing about Tom Hardy’s novel written in 1874, you will undoubtedly enjoy the story as it unfolds on the screen.  I had never read the book or seen earlier movie versions.  (Yes, sometimes it appears that I’ve lived under a rock all my life.)

However, if you have read the novel, you should be fairly pleased at how closely it mirrors the original book, taking into consideration an entire novel has been scrunched into a two-hour film.  It has a fairly high tomato meter of 85% on Rotten Tomatoes.

The four main characters portrayed by Carey Mulligan (Bathsheba Everdene), Matthias Schoenaerts (Gabriel Oak), Michael Sheen (William Boldwood), and Tom Sturridge (Frank Troy), were all well casted in their roles.  Carey is a brilliant actress who settled perfectly into the strong-willed young woman.  Her three suitors were equally wonderful in their roles, showing depth and emotion to their characters.

The story centers around Bathsheba Everdene, an independent and pretty young lady who inherits her uncle’s farm. She has no need of a husband, so she says, and doesn’t think any man could ever tame her.  Of course, in those days if she married her wealth and farm would no longer belong to her but to her husband.

As the story first unfolds, she meets Gabriel Oak, a shepherd who falls for Miss Everdene. After an early proposal in their relationship, she refuses even though he owns his own farm. An unfortunate twist in fate overtakes his life, and Gabriel loses everything he owns. Eventually, he becomes one of her employees at her newly inherited farm and their roles have switched. Gabriel Oak continues to yearn for her heart.

Bathsheba intends to astound everyone as she takes control of her new life and catches the eye of another man who is her neighbor. He too swiftly falls for her and proposes marriage, but once again she refuses saying she does not need a husband. The brokenhearted Mr. Boldwood continues to hope, but his hopes are swiftly dashed when the woman he loves meets the dashing Sergeant Frank Troy.

The independent woman is swept off her feet by a pretty-boy in a red uniform. Handsome yes, but his character leaves much to be desired. Gabriel warns her of his ways and to stay clear, but she will hear nothing of it.

Love is blind, and Bathsheba falls hard for the handsome soldier.  Played by Tom Sturridge, he is the epitome of male perfection compared to the middle-aged Mr. Boldwood.  One kiss and one seductive touch of her womanhood while making out in the woods, and the heroine is putty in his hands.

Eventually, through her mistakes and a tragic outcome, she learns a difficult lesson that she does indeed need a man who has been at her side all along. So who does she pick — the strong quiet type, the rich nobleman of a neighbor, or the handsome pretty boy in red?  You’ll have to find out for yourself.

I won’t tell you anything else about the storyline in case you’ve been hiding under a rock too. No need to spoil a good flick.  If you have the chance, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised at this beautifully filmed movie set in the English countryside and coastline.

The romance sweetly ends leaving a satisfied outcome.  I thoroughly enjoyed being tucked away in the theater for two hours and far from the madding crowd outdoors to watch this splendid period drama.

  1 comment for “Far From the Madding Crowd (Movie 2015)

  1. June 23, 2017 at 4:43 pm

    I recently saw the 1967 version and found it really captivating, the cast were splendid and the DP work sumptuous. Hardy is a difficult beast to tame for the screen, although I am not a purist and happy for changes to be made but with this film having a mere 2 hour running time I wonder how much will be cut or altered. Plus I am not sold on the cast.

    Like

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